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Coastal storm impact risk mapped on Long Island

UPDATED (Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 11am)

In anticipation of Hurricane Sandy, you can use the Long Island Index mapping site to view the areas that would be at greatest risk from the storm.

You can also use Nassau County‘s or Suffolk County‘s websites for more information.


ORIGINAL POST (August 2011)

The latest tracking information for Hurricane Irene (as of Friday morning, 8/26) shows that the storm is likely going to pass east of New York City and make a head on collision with Long Island.  Newsday is reporting that it will hit western Suffolk County’s south shore on Saturday with “tropical-storm-force winds” and then ramp up to 110 mph winds by Sunday.  Yikes!

To help prepare for the storm, our team at the CUNY Graduate Center in collaboration with the Long Island Index has updated the Index’s mapping website with areas at greatest risk of hurricane-level storms.

Here’s the map:

This news release [PDF] provides more information.  The yellow-to-red shaded areas are “coastal storm impact zones.”  In 2005, the New York State Office of Emergency Management developed a map of areas that would be at greatest risk of hurricane impacts based on wind speed and other factors.

The shorthand for the map is a “SLOSH” map, because the zones of impact are based on NOAA’s “Sea, Lake and Overland Surge from Hurricanes” (SLOSH) model projections of vertical surge heights associated with category 1 – 4 storms.  In order to map this information at the Index site, we downloaded the SLOSH data from the NYS GIS Clearinghouse website (metadata here) and used the following color shading to represent the zones:

  • A Category 1 storm (impact areas shown on the map in yellow) means winds of 74-95 mph.
  • A Category 2 storm (impact areas shown on the map in light orange) means winds of 96-110 mph.
  • A Category 3 storm (impact areas shown on the map in dark orange) means winds of 111-130 mph.
  • A Category 4 storm (impact areas shown on the map in red) means winds of 131 mph or more.
If you’re in an area highlighted on the map, be sure to contact your local officials and follow media reports about the hurricane’s progress. Nassau County’s Office of Emergency Management has posted a map of evacuation routes if it comes to that:
Hopefully Irene passes us by, but if not: be prepared.  Better safe than sorry.
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