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  • SR_spatial tweets

    • RT @MikeLydon: All politics aside, we should celebrate Alabama’s vote for human decency tonight. However, we should also loathe that it was… 8 hours ago
    • RT @DrPhilGoff: I get that this is a big election. But I really won’t have a high tolerance for folks celebrating “the sex offending slaver… 9 hours ago
    • RT @BillKristol: I’m sitting at Midway airport and—you won’t believe this!—I don’t see anyone else on his computer feverishly trying to fig… 9 hours ago

About

About this blog, or me?  Well, both, really.  This blog is an extension of my professional interests, so learning a bit about yours truly will give you a good sense of what I’ll be writing about.  Thanks for stopping by.

Since the early 1990s I’ve had the good fortune to focus my work on using geographic information systems (GIS) to help large and small nonprofits, public agencies, businesses, and others to understand and act on the spatial dimensions of their data and programs. I started using GIS (MapInfo) when desktop GIS was just taking root, co-founded and directed a nonprofit GIS service bureau after finishing the urban planning masters program at Columbia University, and led a team creating community-focused online mapping applications in the late 90s and early 2000s far in advance of the emerging neogeography movement. 

Currently I direct the CUNY Mapping Service at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY).  We help other CUNY researchers leverage GIS in their work (including my colleagues at the Center for Urban Research), provide GIS services to clients including New York City agencies, philanthropic foundations in the New York area and nationwide, nonprofits, consulting firms, and others, and develop rich, interactive, online mapping applications that take full advantage of the latest Web/Where 2.0 tools and techniques.  I also teach GIS to graduate level urban planning students at Pratt Institute.

A theme throughout my work (extending back to my environmental advocacy days) has been public access to data — identifying, obtaining, analyzing, and providing widespread access to data sets (especially government data) that help people understand their local environments.

During downtime between pitching ideas, managing projects, securing funding, and working with clients and partner groups, I thoroughly enjoy making maps (primarily with ESRI’s desktop products), integrating data into and designing our online maps (primarily with ESRI’s server suite), and geocoding data for clients (primarily with MapInfo).

More about me…

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One Response

  1. […] some, like Steven Romalewski, the director of CUNY Mapping Service at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York […]

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