Coastal storm impact risk mapped in NYC

UPDATED (Monday, Oct. 29, 2012 1pm)

If you need to locate any of NYC’s 76 hurricane evacuation shelters, you can use the OASIS mapping site.

You can also use NYC.gov to find out the latest with Hurricane Sandy.


UPDATED (8/25/11 9am): We’ve added a temporary map layer on OASIS showing the locations of NYC’s hurricane evacuation centers. Here’s the link: http://bit.ly/oBsUY8 . It’s easy to use:

  • Hover your mouse over each one to highlight it (the site details will also be highlighted in the panel on the right).
  • Click on a map marker to bring the site details up to the top of the list.
  • Double-click on a site in the list and the map will zoom in right to that location.

You can type in your address above the map to see if you’re in an area that’s at risk of storm impacts, and how close you are to an evacuation center. The OASIS map automatically also shows any nearby subway stations. And you can add any other layers from the Legend list to the right of the map.

For more information about Hurricane Irene and what you should do to prepare, visit NYC’s website.

UPDATED (8/24/11 12 noon): We’ve expanded the map layer showing hurricane impact zones throughout the downstate region. It now shows potential impact zones on Long Island’s south shore, as well as some areas along the coast of the Long Island Sound.

ORIGINAL POST

For the past several years the www.OASISnyc.net mapping site has displayed a map of “coastal storm impact zones” in New York City (in addition to the wealth of other mapped data included with OASIS). This coming weekend, it seems like the coastal storm map may be especially useful with city officials bracing for the risk of Hurricane Irene bringing 72 mph winds or more to the NYC region by Sunday.

In 2005, the New York State Office of Emergency Management developed a map of areas that would be at greatest risk of hurricane impacts based on wind speed and other factors. The shorthand for the map is a “SLOSH” map, because the zones of impact are based on NOAA’s “Sea, Lake and Overland Surge from Hurricanes” (SLOSH) model projections of vertical surge heights associated with category 1 – 4 storms.

In 2006, we downloaded the SLOSH data from the NYS GIS Clearinghouse website (metadata here), and used the following color shading to represent the zones:

  • A Category 1 storm (impact areas shown on the map in yellow) means winds of 74-95 mph.
  • A Category 2 storm (impact areas shown on the map in light orange) means winds of 96-110 mph.
  • A Category 3 storm (impact areas shown on the map in dark orange) means winds of 111-130 mph.
  • A Category 4 storm (impact areas shown on the map in red) means winds of 131 mph or more.

Here’s the map:

Through the OASIS website, you can easily enter your address and find out if you’re in an area that might be at greatest risk of the hurricane, depending on how severe the winds are by the time Irene moves up the coast. But the real power of OASIS’s maps is that you can do much more. For example, you can:

  • customize the OASIS map to show transit routes, schools, public housing, and libraries in or near the zones;
  • use OASIS’s mapping tools to see areas near the zones that have been recently developed (using the 1996-2010 aerial image timeline tool);
  • zoom in to see individual property boundaries and click on each one to determine ownership, zoning, and land use characteristics; and
  • find out which elected officials represent the area, as well as the local Community Board (good sources for planning and safety resources).

In the images below, I’ve used the aerial timeline slider and the dynamic transparency tool to show recent housing development in an area at risk of impact from a Category 1 storm, along South Beach on Staten Island (at the OASIS website, you can click and drag the name of any map layer in the Legend to the “Transparency Control” box at the bottom of the legend and make it more or less transparent, so the layers underneath can shine through):

Sparse housing near the beach (1996)

Dense housing development (2010)

The zones mapped on OASIS closely mirror the city’s hurricane evacuation zones (mapped here [PDF] and described here). The city also provides a Hurricane Evacuation Zone Finder where you can enter an address and get useful safety tips depending on your zone.

The message: hopefully Irene passes us by, but if not: be prepared. Better safe than sorry.

4 Responses

  1. […] http://www.oasisnyc.net/ New York community mapping efforts Steve Romalewski has his Spatiality blog providing updates on mapping efforts in New york – see this post. This includes details of […]

  2. […] I wrote a blog post about how using OASIS could help people see if they were in harm’s way if the storm hit the […]

  3. […] Crain’s New York Business), and the city’s hurricane evacuation centers (more on that here). GA_googleAddAttr("AdOpt", "1"); GA_googleAddAttr("Origin", "other"); […]

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