Who Represents You in NYC

UPDATE

NY1 – New York City’s 24-hour cable news channel – featured the maps in a segment they aired during the Thursday, June 20 segment of the “Road to City Hall”. We’ve posted a link to the video below:

NY1 Road to City Hall 6/20/13 segment on Who Represents Me

The Graduate Center also posted a news release about the project.

JUNE 10, 2013

Today our Center for Urban Research at the Graduate Center / CUNY joined with the League of Women Voters to launch an online service so anyone can identify their elected officials in New York City.

The idea behind this “Who Represents Me” service is not new (in fact, my old team at NYPIRG’s Community Mapping Assistance Project pioneered it more than a decade ago).  But now that redistricting has changed all the legislative boundaries in the city (and the City Council lines will all be new by January 2014) it seemed like the perfect time for a reprise of our Who Represents Me service from 2000, updated with new data and new technology.

WRM_mainscreen2

How it works

Anyone can enter a street address at the “Who Represents Me” website, or if they’re using a mobile device they can tap the Use My Current Location link. The site displays a list of all city, state, and federal elected representatives (as well as NYC Community Board), an interactive map of the district and all districts nearby, contact information for local offices, and links for more information such as email addresses, individual websites, Twitter feeds, and Facebook pages of elected officials.

Users can also link to candidate information using the League’s VOTE411.org interactive voter guide. And we provide district-specific links to DecideNYC.com’s candidate summaries.

According to Mary Lou Urban, Co-President of the League of Women Voters of the City of New York,

resources like MyGovNYC.org are what it takes to make participation in government appealingly simple and is a logical approach to increasing voter participation.

New data

We believe our Who Represents Me service will be even more popular and helpful than it was over a decade ago.

First, the League of Women Voters is providing up-to-date info for all elected officials across the city.  The League keeps this information current through ongoing contact with all officials at all levels of government.  Initially the League collected this data for its 2013 They Represent You brochure (which you can order here).  And they’ll be providing new info periodically for the online service.

We supplemented the League’s info with data from Sunlight Foundation, the Open States project, and local websites with contact information and photographs of City Council members, state legislators, congressional representatives, and executive branch officials.

WRM_councilexample

New features

One of the best features of the service is that Who Represents Me can be embedded in anyone’s website, blog, etc. So all the advocacy groups, elected officials, media outlets, and others who use the service can widely share it and make it their own.

Anyone can use the service, Tweet about it, post it to Facebook, and/or create and share a location-specific link to the list of representatives.  Just click the “LINK / EMBED” option at the top of the page and the link like the one below will automatically display the list of officials for that location:

http://mygovnyc.org/?levelofgovt=city&latlng=40.748724%2C-73.98420499999997

District maps

We used a combination of cartoDB, Google Maps API, and the Twitter Bootstrap framework to add a flexible and helpful interactive map overlay to the service.  Just click a thumbnail map of any district, and a new window is displayed that shows all the district boundaries for that location.  Hover over the list of districts and each one is highlighted on the map.  Double-click on a district in the list, and the map zooms to its extent.

WRM_mapexample

Most important, you can click anywhere on the map and new districts are highlighted for that location.  And the list of representatives is automatically updated when you close the map window.

So the maps — combined with the address search and current location feature — enable you to determine elected representatives literally for any and every location in the city.

Credits

“Who Represents Me: NYC” has been developed with the generous support of the New York Community Trust.

Geographic data sources for the service include:

The geographic data representing district boundaries is hosted at cartoDB. The overall site design relies on the Twitter Bootstrap framework. We use the Google Maps API for address matching, “typeahead” address search, and basemaps.

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Interactive “Comparinator” maps launched for NYC Council districting

UPDATE Sept 7, 2012

The City Council Comparinator site is now embeddable for your website, blog, etc.

Here’s how to use it:

  • go to the site,
  • zoom to a district and click to highlight it (or enter a street address),
  • choose one of the tabs above the map (Side-by-Side vs Overlay, for example), and
  • pick which proposal you’re comparing with (Districting Commission or Unity Plan).
  • Then click “Link” in the upper right and you’ll see the embed code as well as the basic linking code.

Sample embed code:

We also added a feature: if you turn off the popup window before clicking “Link”, it’ll add a “popup=false” property to the URL, so the person viewing the link (or the starting image for your embedded map) won’t have the popup in the way but the district will still be highlighted.

Here’s an example:


ORIGINAL POST Sept 5, 2012:

NYC Council Districting and You

How existing City Council districts compare with proposed lines

councilcomparinatorscreenshot.PNG

Our Center for Urban Research (CUR) at the CUNY Graduate Center has launched an interactive map today to visualize proposed New York City Council districts compared with existing ones along with the demographic characteristics and patterns within the districts.

The Center hopes the map will help involve people in the NYC districting process simply by showing them how proposed or newly drawn lines looked in relation to their homes or workplaces. Our map is not for drawing districts; others such as the NYC Districting Commission are providing that service.   But CUR’s comparison maps are designed to be be engaging enough to visualize the impact of redistricting for everyone from local citizens to redistricting professionals, hopefully inspiring people to participate more actively in the process.

CUR’s map was designed and is being maintained independently from the NYC Districting Commission’s website. However, we hope that people who use CUR’s maps will then access the Districting Commission’s website for drawing maps online.

Using the map

The main features of the map are as follows:

  • Enter your address to find out what district currently represents you, and which proposed district you’d live in.
  • If you’re using the “Side-by-Side” view, the current districts are displayed on the left, and the proposed districts on the right.
  • If you’re using the “Overlay” view, you can move the transparency slider to the right to display proposed districts, or to the left to fade back to current districts.
  • Click anywhere on the map to highlight the current and proposed districts.
  • When you enter an address or click on the map, an info window pops up listing the current and proposed districts. You can click the link for the current district to go to that Councilmember’s website.
  • Click the “Link” in the upper right of the page to get a direct link to the area of the map you’re viewing. (This one zooms in on City Council District 8 in Manhattan.) You can share this on Twitter or Facebook, email it to friends and colleagues, or blog about it and include the link.

Credits

The mapping application was developed by the Center for Urban Research. David Burgoon, CUR’s application architect, constructed and designed the site, with data analysis support and overall conception from CUR’s Mapping Service director Steven Romalewski.

The application relies on geographic data hosting by cartoDB, open source mapping frameworks and services including OpenLayers and Bing maps, and ESRI’s ArcGIS software for cartography and data analysis.

Data sources

Current City Council district boundaries and proposed maps from the NYC Districting Commission are based on block assignment lists provided at the Districting Commission’s website.

Other proposed maps such as the Unity Map are provided by the advocacy organizations who developed those proposals.

NYS Congressional districts & eligible voters mapped

Just three months after the US District Court approved the redistricted Congressional districts for New York, the state is holding primary elections for Republican and Democratic candidates for Congress and US Senate.

In an effort to help analysts understand the voting patterns for the primary and general elections for Congress in New York, our Center for Urban Research at the CUNY Graduate Center has updated a map of Congressional districts to highlight the differences between eligible voters by district and overall population counts.  The map is accessible at www.urbanresearchmaps.org/nycongress2012/map.html

Among other things, our new map displays the “citizen voting age population” (CVAP) estimates for each district as well as overall population counts.  When you visit the map, move your mouse over each district to display total population counts by race/ethnicity along with “citizen voting age population” (CVAP) estimates.   We also have a brief analysis of CVAP estimates compared with total population for each district.

In many Congressional districts, especially in New York City, news reports have noted the changing demographics, partly due to population shifts but also due to new boundaries that are the result of redistricting.  Districts that may once have had a predominantly Black population, for example, may now have a more mixed population.

But overall race and ethnicity population counts only tell part of the story.  Population data from the decennial 2010 Census include all residents — citizens as well as recent immigrants who may not yet be citizens, and people who are of voting age (18 or older) as well as children.  In some cases, the eligible voting population has a much different racial and ethnic profile than the overall population.

Proposed Congressional districts for NYS available in GIS format

UPDATE June 25, 2012

We launched a companion map featuring Congressional districts with statistics on eligible voters by race/ethnicity compared with total population.

UPDATE March 6, 2012

We’ve added Congressional districts as proposed by District Court Judge Hon. Roanne Mann to our interactive redistricting site. Here’s a link that compares District 9 (Rep. Turner, in NYC) with one of the proposed districts that it would become under her proposed lines: http://t.co/01K4hMu8

We also submitted a letter today to the court [PDF] suggesting that they can use our maps to visually compare the different proposed lines.  Hopefully they’ll put our online maps to good use as they review the different Congressional district proposals.


UPDATE March 5, 2012

We’ve made two updates the information below.

  1. We’ve added the Congressional district data in shapefile and KMZ formats based on Common Cause’s submission to the court.  We think this will be especially helpful since the court has asked the intervenors to compare their maps with Common Cause’s proposal.
  2. Now you can visualize the proposed districts based on the mapped data below at the Center for Urban Research’s interactive redistricting site.
    1. compare with existing Congressional districts;
    2. easily switch among the Congressional proposals from Common Cause and the Senate & Assembly majorities; and
    3. view the proposed districts in relation to block-level demographic maps (do any of them appear to “pack,” “crack,” or dilute the potential voting power of minority populations?) or local voting patterns (click the “More Data” tab at the bottom right).

Here are some examples:

Today the New York World posted an analysis of how these different Congressional district proposals might impact Rep. Charles Rangel’s current district 15.


Original Post

If you’re hoping to use GIS or any of the online mapping tools to map the Congressional district lines in New York State that were proposed late yesterday, you’ll have some work to do.  The maps were released in PDF format as well as “block assignment lists” for the proposed districts.

But if you’d like to use shapefiles and/or KML files, you’ve come to right place!  Our team at the CUNY Graduate Center has created them and posted them for downloading here:

http://www.urbanresearch.org/news/proposed-congress-districts-in-gis-format/

We hope to add these soon to our interactive redistricting map. Stay tuned!

Redistricting’s partisan impacts: a GIS analysis

Our team at the Center for Urban Research is collaborating with The New York World to analyze the impacts of redistricting in New York State.  The latest effort was featured today on the front page of the Times Union; it focuses on how the majority parties in the State Senate and Assembly would likely retain — and strengthen — their control of both houses through the redrawn district lines.

Briefly, we found that the new boundaries for state Senate and Assembly districts proposed by LATFOR would increase the number of seats held by the majority parties in both chambers.  We based the analysis on 2010 election data available from LATFOR’s website.  The goal was to determine the results of state legislative elections held within the new districts if voters cast their ballots in the exact same way as they did in 2010, the most recent election year for State Senate and Assembly.

  • In the State Senate, the Republican Party’s 32-to-30 majority would expand to 34-to-29 if each voter cast his or her ballot in support of the same party as in the 2010 elections.
  • In the State Assembly, the 98-to-50 advantage the Democrats enjoyed following 2010’s elections would also increase, to 102-to-48.

The project was a good example of the power of GIS.  The analysis didn’t necessarily need a map to display the results (though Michael Keller at the NY World put together a nice one). But the analysis effectively wouldn’t have been possible without GIS.

Converting Polygons to Points

We analyzed election results at the level of voter tabulation districts, or VTDs, which are several blocks in size and typically cast no more than a few hundred votes in state legislative elections.  We mapped the VTDs onto the new lines proposed by LATFOR, then added up the votes of all VTDs that fell within a proposed district to determine its outcome.

In order to allocate the VTD-level vote counts to LATFOR’s proposed districts, CUR matched VTDs spatially with the current and proposed legislative district using ESRI’s ArcGIS Desktop software. The current and proposed Senate and Assembly districts are coterminous with Census blocks (in fact, the districts are “built” using Census blocks).  Unfortunately, neither LATFOR nor the state’s Board of Elections provides election results at the block level.  The Board of Elections records data by election district, which sometimes are smaller than VTDs, but for this project we did not have access to the election district data.

The challenge was that where the VTDs were larger than Census blocks in some places, the VTD boundaries crisscrossed the district lines (see example at right from Queens; click to enlarge).  In order to assign Senate and Assembly district IDs to each VTD, CUR converted the VTD boundaries to centroids (the geographic center-point of each VTD).  We used the lat/lon centroid values provided by the Census Bureau’s TIGER data.  Then we used a spatial join using ArcGIS to add legislative district identifiers to each VTD based on the legislative district its centroid was inside.  See the image below for the locations of the VTD centroids in this area of Queens.

In the instances where VTDs crisscross legislative districts, this technique will allocate all of a VTD’s votes to a single legislative district rather than splitting them across multiple districts.  This will over- and underestimate vote totals in some districts. But the process avoids the cumbersome effort involved in the alternative: splitting VTD vote counts.  The splitting process uses one of two methods:

  • using block-level population to “spread” the VTD votes across the VTD (multiplying the VTD vote count by the percentage of the VTD population occupied by each block and assigning the result to each block), or
  • weighting the VTD vote count based on the area of the portion of the VTD in each district.

Either of these approaches will result in fractions of people being assigned to one legislative district or another.  In fact, LATFOR appears to have used some sort of weighting method to assign election district vote counts to VTDs, since some of LATFOR’s VTD vote totals included fractions.

The centroid-approach and the weighted population / area approach both make assumptions about how to allocate vote counts.  But we tested the centroid process with current legislative districts and found that our VTD-allocated vote totals either exactly matched the results from the Board of Elections or were within a few hundred votes (which did not change the 2010 outcome).

Whether we used the centroid-approach and the weighted population / area technique, it otherwise would’ve been difficult if not impossible to determine how to allocate the VTD-level vote counts to legislative districts without GIS.  There are almost 15,000 VTDs across New York State, and there are (currently) 62 Senate districts and 150 Assembly districts.  With GIS, the process was relatively straightforward and efficient.

Aggregating by District

At the VTD-level, LATFOR provides the total number of votes cast by party in each election, not by candidate.  One challenge that we confronted was assigning the votes cast for fusion candidates who were backed by a major party but also received support on smaller parties’ ballot lines.  For example, many Democratic candidates received significant numbers of votes on the Working Families Party ballot line, and many Republicans got substantial support on the Conservative Party line.  Cross-party endorsements were even more variable for the Independence Party: in some districts, the Democrat received support on the Independence Party line; in others, its endorsement went to the Republican.

We decided that the most accurate way to re-map the election results was to assign the votes for each VTD based on the actual vote patterns for the Senate or Assembly district that contained that VTD in 2010.  In other words, if the Democratic candidate in an Assembly district ran on the Democratic, Conservative, and Independence lines, we assigned the Democratic, Conservative, and Independence votes in all the VTDs in that district to the Democratic candidate.  When we allocated the VTDs to the proposed Senate and Assembly districts, we added up the votes based on these patterns.  This ensured that the local voting patterns from 2010 were allocated accurately to the proposed districts.

The Results: Maps vs. Plain Old Numbers

The result is that we were able to calculate the number of proposed districts that, all other things being equal, would have had a Democratic winner in the Assembly and a Republican winner in the State Senate.  The important finding is that both parties would have increased their majority — which is especially interesting in the Senate, where the Republicans currently only have a 1-seat majority.  In Albany, the majority in each house is extremely powerful, so holding on to (or improving) those margins is all-important.

Of course, as the New York World/Times Union article points out,

To be sure, no district votes the exactly the same way in consecutive elections: the quality of candidates, changes in the population and the national political climate (which in 2010 favored Republicans) all play important roles. But voting behavior in previous elections offers the best available indication as to how a district is likely to perform.

The map that the New York World published along with the article uses red/blue color-shading to visualize the impact of the voting patterns on the proposed districts.  In the state Senate, the analysis shows the majority party increasing the number of seats by two.  On the map, that result is almost lost in the sea of red districts (most of the Republican seats are in upstate New York and Long Island, where the districts cover much larger areas than the more densely populated and largely Democratic districts in New York City).  The real power of our finding is the change in number: from 32 to 34.  In some ways, that says it all.

Nonetheless, the map (along with CUR’s interactive map comparing current and proposed district boundaries) provides a strong graphic and interactive element to the story, and provides context as you move your mouse over the districts to see the vote totals change from one to the next.

Watch for more analysis as LATFOR publishes its proposed Congressional district lines, and when the final Senate and Assembly districts are drawn.

Interactive NY redistricting map with cartoDB and more

UPDATE Nov. 5, 2012

In preparation for the Nov. 2012 election, many news organizations and others are linking to our interactive State Legislature and Congressional redistricting maps. We’ve posted examples at the Center for Urban Research website.


UPDATE Sept. 7, 2012

We’ve updated our map of redistricted State Senate and Assembly districts, highlighting the differences in race/ethnicity characteristics between total population and voter-eligible population – in other words, comparing the characteristics of all those who live in the new districts versus the smaller group who will be eligible to vote for each district’s representatives.  In some cases the differences are striking.

Our examination of the district-by-district data is available here.


New York State, like all other states, is in the midst of redrawing its legislative district lines. To help you follow along, our team at the Center for Urban Research has launched an interactive redistricting map for New York.  We collaborated with The New York World to develop the maps (though we encourage anyone and everyone to use them!).

The World’s reporters and editors are using our maps to go between the lines and explain how redistricting really works in the Empire State. (Here’s their first piece: The art of redistricting war.)  And we hope you’ll be able to use the maps too, to help answer questions such as:

  • Will you still be represented by the same State Senate or Assembly district you live in now?
  • Will you live in the newly proposed (and controversial) 63rd Senate district?
  • Is your neighborhood, town, or county going to be “carved up” by a new legislative seat?
  • Will your community’s historical voting power be diluted by the new districts?

We have some examples of gerrymandering at our Center’s website. In the meantime, here’s how you can use the maps.

Map features

The maps compare the current and proposed district lines (which our team mapped based on Census block lists published by the state’s redistricting task force, known as LATFOR). Here’s how they work:

  • Enter your address to find out what district currently represents you, and which proposed district you’d live in.
  • The current districts are on the left, and the proposed districts on the right.
  • You can also click on either map to highlight the current and proposed districts. As you move one map, the other moves in sync.
  • When you enter an address or click on the map, an info window pops up listing the current and proposed districts. You can click the link for the current district to go to that Senator or Assemblymember’s website.
  • Switch between State Senate and Assembly districts. Congressional districts will be posted once the data is available from LATFOR.
  • You can zoom in to street level, or zoom out to a statewide view. Switch between a street basemap or an aerial view from Microsoft’s Bing maps to see geographic details.

If you’re using the “Overlay” view, you can move the transparency slider to the right to display proposed districts, and to the left to fade back to current districts. The video below shows how:

If you want to share the map you’ve made, click the “Link” in the upper right of the map page to get a direct link to the area of the map you’re viewing. It will look like this:

http://www.urbanresearchmaps.org/nyredistricting/map.html?
lat=40.72852&lon=-73.99655&zoom=13&maptype=SIDEBYSIDE
&districttype=SENATE
  • You can share this on Twitter, Facebook, etc and email it to friends and colleagues.
  • You can also embed the map at your site. Use this link …
http://www.urbanresearchmaps.org/nyredistricting/map.html?output=embed
  • … or add < &output=embed > to any of the direct links you create, like this:
http://www.urbanresearchmaps.org/nyredistricting/map.html?
lat=40.72852&lon=-73.99655&zoom=13&maptype=SIDEBYSIDE
&districttype=SENATE&output=embed
  • … or wrap the snippet below in an iframe tag (I’d wrap it myself, but wordpress.com strips out iframe tags):
src="http://www.urbanresearchmaps.org/nyredistricting/map.html?output=embed" 
frameborder="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" 
scrolling="no" width="600" height="700"

Side-by-side maps with OpenLayers

We borrowed from our “Census Comparinator” mapping site that Dave Burgoon artfully developed, in order to provide three ways to compare the current and proposed legislative districts:

  • a side-by-side view — two maps that are synced and move as one;
  • an overlay — a single map where you can fade between current and proposed districts; and
  • the vertical “before-and-after” slider approach.

I blogged about the Comparinator approach here and here. John Reiser also gave the technique a shoutout at his “Learning Web Mapping” blog for Rowan University.

With Census data, our “Comparinator” approach helped visualize changing spatial patterns of race/ethnicity trends – in cartographic terms, between two choropleth maps. With legislative districts, the comparison is between two sets of boundary files with no inner fill. So here we’ve set the side-by-side view as the default — we think the side by side maps give the easiest way of visualizing how the districts may change. But we also give you the option of viewing the districts with our vertical slider bar if you’d like, or the overlay.

Behind the scenes

For the proposed districts, we used ArcGIS to create the legislative district shapefiles based on LATFOR’s Census block assignment lists.  The current district boundaries are from the Census Bureau’s TIGER files (here’s the FTP page if you’d like to download the “lower” house districts — in New York, that’s the Assembly — or the “upper” house shapefiles — the State Senate).

We use OpenLayers for the map display and navigation with this application, as we’ve done with most of our other interactive maps. OpenLayers is easy to use, enables us to access Bing map tiles directly (so the basemap performance is smooth), and provides a robust JavaScript library for online maps.

That said, newer approaches such as Leaflet.js enable more interaction such as mouseovers, so we’ve started experimenting with some impressive new tools. More to follow!

One of those new tools is the powerful backend geospatial database engine from the team at Vizzuality: cartoDB. Hosting the legislative district shapefiles on cartoDB provided lots of advantages over hosting the data ourselves or setting up an Amazon cloud instance on our own. cartoDB provides:

  • great performance — not only for the district boundaries, but soon we’ll be adding election district maps to show voting patterns within each Senate and Assembly district. We don’t want to bother with creating pre-rendered tiles for this data. cartoDB will render it speedily on the fly.
  • cartographic flexibility: cartoDB uses cartoCSS for map symbology and labeling. Though there are still some quirks with cartoCSS, it was easy to grasp and it’s basically just CSS, so it makes styling easy if you’re familiar with modern web design. And cartoCSS incorporates scale-dependent rendering as well as attribute-based symbology, which makes it powerful and flexible. CartoCSS can be implemented using the cartoDB management interface, or programmatically.
  • easy data management: if you know SQL — and even better, if you’re familiar with SQL commands with PostGIS — you can quickly and easily modify tables, filter data, and perform spatial operations. (The screenshots at the cartoDB github page offer some examples.) Very cool.
  • scaling: cartoDB uses PostGIS and makes use of Amazon’s platform. So if our maps go viral, we’re ready for the usage spike!
  • open source: if you want to manage your own instance of cartoDB, just download the code and go! Big props to Vizzuality for an amazing geospatial toolkit.

Other thanks go to:

  • LATFOR, the state’s redistricting task force. Whatever you think about their redistricting process, they’ve done a great job with open data. They’ve not only posted the list of Census blocks that make up each proposed legislative district. But they also posted a wealth of data at the Census block level and also at the election district level (with a crosswalk between EDs and Census “voter tabulation districts”). This data is indispensable for visualizing, analyzing, and (hopefully) making sense of the new districts.
  • Dave Burgoon and the CUR team. Dave put together the redistricting mapping site in record time. Although it’s based on work he had already done with the Census Comparinator maps, it still involved substantial modifications and enhancements. But he made it happen as professionally and elegantly as always.
  • The New York World. We had been planning to create an interactive mapping application to build on our Census Comparinator site and to help people visualize the impacts of the redistricting process and demographic changes more broadly.  But the World team – Alyssa Katz, Michael Keller, and Sasha Chavkin – met with us a few weeks ago to discuss how we could collaborate on analyzing and mapping the upcoming district proposals from LATFOR.  The discussion inspired us to roll out a mapping site specific to New York State and focused on comparing the current and proposed districts. We’re thrilled to be able to work closely with them on this project (watch for more maps and data in the near future!).
  • The Hagedorn Foundation. The Foundation has provided funding support for our efforts to map and analyze Census data for a variety of civic engagement purposes, especially for Hagedorn’s Long Island-based grantees but also nationwide. Their support has been essential for us to develop innovative mapping applications like the NYS redistricting maps – not to advocate specific district plans one way or another, but to give local residents and others the tools they need to understand the impact of redistricting and hopefully get involved in the process.

Proposed NYS Senate & Assembly districts available in GIS format

UPDATE Nov. 5, 2012

In preparation for the Nov. 2012 election, many news organizations and others are linking to our interactive State Legislature and Congressional redistricting maps. We’ve posted examples at the Center for Urban Research website.


UPDATE Sept. 7, 2012

We’ve updated our map of redistricted State Senate and Assembly districts, highlighting the differences in race/ethnicity characteristics between total population and voter-eligible population – in other words, comparing the characteristics of all those who live in the new districts versus the smaller group who will be eligible to vote for each district’s representatives.  In some cases the differences are striking.

Our examination of the district-by-district data is available here.  The New York Times gave our analysis a shout-out in their CityRoom primary election day column.

You can also visit our original NYS redistricting “comparinator” map described below, at www.urbanresearchmaps.org/nyredistricting/map.html


UPDATE February 5, 2012

You can visualize these proposed districts in relation to the current New York State Senate and Assembly districts with our new interactive redistricting map.  We developed the interactive map in collaboration with The New York World, and here’s an article using the maps to describe the redistricting process in the Empire State.  For more background on the interactive map, visit this blog post.


Original Post

If you’re hoping to use GIS or any of the online mapping tools to map the legislative district lines in New York State that were proposed today by the state’s redistricting task force, you’ll have some work to do.  The Task Force released PDF maps as well as “block assignment lists” for the proposed districts.

Unless you’d like to use the shapefiles and/or KML files that our team at the CUNY Graduate Center created!  Here’s our web page with the info: http://www.urbanresearch.org/news/proposed-nys-districts-in-gis-format

Happy redistricting mapping!