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Long Island special districts mapped online for the 1st time

In partnership with the Long Island Index, our team at the CUNY Graduate Center has mapped the complex and complicated special taxation districts and service provider areas throughout Nassau County.  We’ve updated this information at the Index’s mapping site, along with a new street address search feature.

I couldn’t say it any better than the Index’s news release on the project, so I’ve reproduced that verbatim below.


Nassau County’s Special Districts and Service Providers Mapped for the First Time

The Long Island Index, in collaboration with the Center for Urban Research at the CUNY Graduate Center, launched a new tool on its website that for the first time provides public access to maps representing the profusion of special districts that exist within Nassau County’s villages and towns. Visitors to the site are now able to search by street address or village to view any or all of the 240 fire, sanitation, water, library, parks, parking, police, school and sewer districts – as well as areas where local, county, or state government provides these services – and see clearly who provides what services and where. This new tool is the result of a comprehensive project to delineate all service provider boundaries using computer-mapping software, which integrates data on special districts from multiple sources. The maps are intended to give taxpayers and service providers a common and consistent basis for discussing special district issues.

map

The Long Island Index’s new mapping tool allows visitors to view any or all of the 240 fire, sanitation, water, library, parks, parking, police, school and sewer service providers in Nassau County.

Want to know how many different entities provide water services in Nassau County and their exact boundaries? Well, now you can see them. Want to know who provides water services in your community? Want to know how they are organized, which are special districts, which are town services? You can find that too. With the click of the mouse you can find the contact information and election data for all the service providers for your property. “This is the kind of tool we were looking for when we first started studying how services are provided on Long Island,” said Ann Golob, Director of the Long Island Index. “It didn’t exist so we took on the effort and have worked for over two years to collect, analyze and digitize this information. I think it will be a tremendous resource for the region.”

Also available on the site is a report by the Center for Governmental Research (CGR) in Rochester that explains the historical context surrounding the founding of special districts on Long Island along with the issues associated with so many providers. The CGR report, and the data found on the maps (provider names, URL, contact information, election data) can be downloaded from the either the Index Web site or the interactive maps site.

Steven Romalewski, director of the CUNY Mapping Service at the Center for Urban Research, said: “The maps bring a new level of information which will be a valuable resource for anyone trying to understand how special districts affect them. To create the service provider maps, we used raw data from the Nassau County assessor’s office, worked with the Index to validate the information independently, and reviewed additional data such as printed maps, historical metes and bounds, and some boundary maps in computer format from Nassau County. The online navigation is quick and easy with dynamic tools such as transparencies and map layers that combine seamlessly with the existing demographic, land use, and transportation data on the site.”

The site also features a detailed glossary of terms to help people understand the complex nature of different special districts across the county. For example, within the 54 library districts in Nassau County, there are four types: an Association Library, a School District Public Library, a Special District Public Library, and a Public Village Library. The glossary explains how each of these were established, how they are funded, bonding authority, if employees are subject to civil service law, and to what extent the community can be involved.

According to Long Island Association President Kevin Law, “These maps give Long Islanders a fantastic new tool for understanding the complexities that exist within our numerous special districts. It is really the first time that we can see who has what and where. It provides an opportunity to think out of the box about consolidation, which has the potential to improve efficiencies and stabilize taxes. People are only going to be supportive of this kind of initiative if they understand what is going on and these maps clearly show how multiple layers of government are a challenge for Long Island.”

“Civic organizations trying to research special districts in their own communities now have a powerful resource that never existed before,” said Nancy Douzinas, President of the Rauch Foundation and Publisher of the Long Island Index. “These maps will undoubtedly be of significant assistance to community groups, government agencies, private businesses and anyone else interested in Long Island’s communities.” In addition to the support from the Rauch Foundation, the Hagedorn Foundation helped support the initial mapping work leading to this project.

The Long Island Index plans to incorporate Suffolk County’s special districts in the coming months. The Long Island Index special district mapping feature is accessible at www.longislandindexmaps.org.

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Coastal storm impact risk mapped on Long Island

UPDATED (Sunday, Oct. 28, 2012 11am)

In anticipation of Hurricane Sandy, you can use the Long Island Index mapping site to view the areas that would be at greatest risk from the storm.

You can also use Nassau County‘s or Suffolk County‘s websites for more information.


ORIGINAL POST (August 2011)

The latest tracking information for Hurricane Irene (as of Friday morning, 8/26) shows that the storm is likely going to pass east of New York City and make a head on collision with Long Island.  Newsday is reporting that it will hit western Suffolk County’s south shore on Saturday with “tropical-storm-force winds” and then ramp up to 110 mph winds by Sunday.  Yikes!

To help prepare for the storm, our team at the CUNY Graduate Center in collaboration with the Long Island Index has updated the Index’s mapping website with areas at greatest risk of hurricane-level storms.

Here’s the map:

This news release [PDF] provides more information.  The yellow-to-red shaded areas are “coastal storm impact zones.”  In 2005, the New York State Office of Emergency Management developed a map of areas that would be at greatest risk of hurricane impacts based on wind speed and other factors.

The shorthand for the map is a “SLOSH” map, because the zones of impact are based on NOAA’s “Sea, Lake and Overland Surge from Hurricanes” (SLOSH) model projections of vertical surge heights associated with category 1 – 4 storms.  In order to map this information at the Index site, we downloaded the SLOSH data from the NYS GIS Clearinghouse website (metadata here) and used the following color shading to represent the zones:

  • A Category 1 storm (impact areas shown on the map in yellow) means winds of 74-95 mph.
  • A Category 2 storm (impact areas shown on the map in light orange) means winds of 96-110 mph.
  • A Category 3 storm (impact areas shown on the map in dark orange) means winds of 111-130 mph.
  • A Category 4 storm (impact areas shown on the map in red) means winds of 131 mph or more.
If you’re in an area highlighted on the map, be sure to contact your local officials and follow media reports about the hurricane’s progress. Nassau County’s Office of Emergency Management has posted a map of evacuation routes if it comes to that:
Hopefully Irene passes us by, but if not: be prepared.  Better safe than sorry.