Putting transit GIS data to use

UPDATE:

I was reminded recently that Albert Sun‘s terrific Wall St Journal interactive about the spatial patterns of Metrocard usage uses the subway routes in GIS format that I created.  It’s not a major part of the map; the routes are used as a backdrop more than anything. But I was glad the Journal was able to use the data.  (Per the notes from the map, the subway data was “from the MTA. Demographic data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Additional work refining subway line shapes from the CUNY Mapping Service at the City University of NY Graduate Center.”)  Here’s a screen shot:


ORIGINAL POST

Recently I’ve come across several examples of people being able to use the MTA subway and bus data that I had converted to GIS format a couple of years ago.  I know that I’ve been able to put the data to good use.  But I’m especially glad to see others benefiting from my efforts.

So I thought I’d share some maps and links below.  Hopefully this will inspire others to use the data, and to let us know about other examples.  If you’ve been able to use the subway or bus GIS data, please let drop me a line by email or add a comment to this post.  Thanks!

Distance Cartograms

Zach Nichols wrote a week ago that he incorporated my GIS version of NYC subway routes into a blog post about “re-scaling NYC based on MTA transit time.”  Here’s one of his maps (a “distance cartogram”); very cool!

Mobile apps

One of the entrants in last year’s MTA AppQuest contest used the subway route GIS data as a layer on their map for reference.  The app — Dead Escalators — is being updated for distribution in the iTunes App Store.  Look for it there soon!  In the meantime, here are a couple of screen shots:

  

GIS data for student projects

  1. Liz Barry’s students at the New School are incorporating the data into their projects.  Glad to be of help, and thanks Liz for your kind words!
  2. Christopher Bride, a GIS student at CUNY’s Lehman College, used the data for his Capstone project this year examining the intersection of food deserts and the likely route home from subway/bus stations.  The project’s goal is to pinpoint fresh food-critical neighborhoods in New York City.  Here are two sample maps, focused on the Bronx:

  1. Lauren Singleton-Meyers at NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development used the subway routes for a project with the New York Center for Alcohol Policy Solutions, for a campaign she’s launched to stop alcohol advertising on public transportation in the city.  As a start, she’s mapped schools and subway routes and stations.  Next steps will be to link pictures of alcohol ads to the subway route lines as part of an educational effort showing what types of ads are being displayed on each route.

Here’s her map (a work in progress) via ArcGISOnline and ArcGIS Explorer:

  Here are some example photos via her Flickr stream.  If anyone has suggestions on helping her with the next steps for her map, please get in touch (their Twitter handle is @EMTAA).

Inspiring similar efforts in other cities

Soon after I wrote my blog post with the MTA’s data in GIS format, it had an impact not only here in New York but in at least one other city: Chicago.  Blogger and urban planning advocate Steve Vance adapted my methodology to transform the GTFS data from the Chicago Transit Authority into GIS format.  Here’s his post: http://www.stevencanplan.com/2010/obtaining-chicago-transit-authority-geodata/ , plus a more in-depth discussion of his technique: http://www.stevencanplan.com/2010/how-to-convert-gtfs-to-shapefiles-and-kml/

Proximity of bus stops to pedestrian accidents

This week the Tri-State Transportation Campaign published an analysis of pedestrian fatalities in Nassau County and several towns in Connecticut, and noted that in Nassau, for example, 83% of the fatalities from 2008-2010 occurred within a quarter-mile of a bus stop.  The group used my GIS version of MTA’s bus GTFS data for their analysis.

I haven’t examined TSTC’s report closely, so I’m not sure how strong of a causal relationship exists between bus stops, per se, and the fatalities (an anonymous commenter at TSTC’s blog argues that “Of course the most pedestrian deaths occur near bus stops, they’re located in the only places in the county where anyone actually walks”).

But one observer on Twitter, @capntransit, wondered if buses are so ubiquitous that the relationship would be a non-issue (they wrote “Isn’t 85% of Nassau County within a quarter-mile of a bus stop?”)  I thought I’d try to answer, and came up with the following by mapping the bus stops and block-level population data from the 2010 Census:

  • Nassau County’s land area is 285 square miles.  The area within 1/4 mile of all LI Bus stops is 119 square miles (42% of the county area); and
  • Nassau’s population in 2010 was 1.34 million people.  The population within 1/4 mile of all LI Bus stops in 2010 was 838,524 people (63% of the county population).
  • So on the face of it, the concentration of fatalities near bus stops seems disproportionately higher than the overall nearby population.  The map below highlights the bus stop coverage:

I’m glad my data conversion efforts have been helpful.  It’s only possible due to the MTA’s ongoing effort to provide easy public access to their data sets.  This enables me and many others to help improve life in and around the city by integrating their data into maps, applications, government accountability efforts, and more.  Please send more examples of how you’ve been able to use the data; highlighting these projects helps us all.

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2 Responses

  1. […] From Steven Romalewski: Recently I’ve come across several examples of people being able to use the MTA subway and bus data that I had converted to GIS format a couple of years ago.  I know that I’ve been able to put the data to good use.  But I’m especially glad to see others benefiting from my efforts…Article. […]

  2. […] Or thanked heaven (at 4 in the morning while trying to finish a studio presentation) for the glorious adjusted data set for MTA subway routes. […]

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