When it rains it pours: NYC GIS data floodgates opened

Lately NYC agencies have started to step up the pace in producing an impressive amount of publicly accessible GIS (and other) data.  It’s a very good direction (and hopefully one that all agencies will soon follow).

This summer, the big news was that MapPLUTO was all of a sudden available for free.  And then ACRIS was opened up (not geospatial, but key to analyzing spatial patterns of property transactions).  And before that HPD had posted a large amount of housing data (albeit in a wacky XML format, but nonetheless it was a lot and it was freely available and it was being updated regularly).

But today there’s even more…

… Historical MapPLUTO!

The latest news – spotted by eagle eye GIS star Jessie Braden – is that historical versions of PLUTO and MapPLUTO are now freely available, going back to 2002.  Really great.

And City Planning included an important but bittersweet note at the historical download page: sweet because all of us who had to sign licenses to obtain PLUTO data are now absolved from the license restrictions, but bitter because there was no mention of the thousands of dollars each of us have had to spend unnecessarily over the years to obtain that data that is now online for free.  Sigh.  Here’s the note:

Note to Licensees:
DCP releases all licensees of PLUTO and MapPLUTO versions 02a through 12v2 from all license restrictions.

One thing to point out about the historical PLUTO data is to be careful if you’re hoping to compare and analyze parcels year to year. Our team at the CUNY Graduate Center tried that a few years ago, and it was painful. So many data inconsistencies and related issues. The best we were able to do was display historical land use patterns via the OASISnyc.net website (for example, look at the disappearance of industrial land use in Williamsburg from 2003 to 2010). I’d be glad to explain in more detail if anyone is interested.

Building footprint data too

Other good news for all of us who use the city’s GIS data is that it seems that building footprints are being updated on a more regular basis, and more attribute information is being added (hat tip to Pratt’s Fred Wolf for discovering it).  The latest building footprint data is dated September 2013, and includes new attributes such as building height and type, and includes a supplemental data set on “historic” buildings (ie., ones that have been demolished, with date of demolition).

Agency data web portals are a beautiful thing

Thankfully the NYC Dept of City Planning staff are continuing to maintain the Bytes of the Big Apple website, where the PLUTO data is available along with many other spatial and non-spatial planning-related data sets.  The Bytes pages provide essential metadata about each data set, easily accessible contact information, and context about the data sets.

All of that is missing from the city’s open data portal, which I think is a major failure with the city’s open data practices.  (Someone even commented on the buildings data set noted above, asking great questions about how the building heights were calculated, and about the source of these calculations – essential information that is too often missing from data sets available through the portal, though usually included when you download the data from the agencies directly.)

As long as the data portal doesn’t undermine invaluable agency websites like Bytes of the Big Apple, and more data keeps getting freed and accessible on these agency sites, that’s a great thing.  And hopefully more agencies will either continue to maintain their own online data repositories (such as the departments of Buildings, Finance, HPD, Health, and others) or launch new ones (such as MTA did a couple of years ago).

Happy holidays …

… and big kudos to the City Planning department for explicitly posting the historical PLUTO data sets!

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One Response

  1. […] wondered if earlier versions could be shared freely as well.  On Friday December 6th, it became apparent to the NYC open data community that MapPluto data from 2003 to present day was now freely available […]

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