Innovative map comparisons – Census change in 15 cities

Our team at the Center for Urban Research (at the CUNY Graduate Center) has updated our interactive maps showing race/ethnicity patterns from 2000 and 2010 in major cities across the US. We’ve enhanced the maps in several ways:

  1. Added more cities. We now have 15 major urban regions mapped across the US (Atlanta, Baltimore, Boston, Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Orlando, Philadelphia, Phoenix, San Francisco, and Washington D.C.).
  2. The maps now have three ways of comparing 2000 and 2010 racial patterns:
  3. We color-coded the population change data in the popup window. Population increase is shown in green; decrease is shown in red. See image below.

Here’s our news release with more info.

Btw, we’ve also updated our static maps to show New York City Council districts, to begin to get a sense of how demographic changes will shape upcoming redistricting efforts at the local level.  Here’s the link:www.urbanresearchmaps.org/plurality/nyccouncil.htm (For the static maps, you can view 2000-2010 demographic change with the vertical slider bar, but you can’t zoom in/out, etc.)

An initial version of the maps launched in June with the vertical bar technique, integrating it with interactive, online maps for the first time. Our Center crafted the maps so you could not only drag the bar left and right but also zoom in and out, click on the map to obtain detailed block-level population counts, and change the underlying basemap from a street view to an aerial image (via OpenLayers use of Microsoft’s Bing maps tiles), while also changing the transparency of the thematic Census patterns.

The latest iteration of CUNY’s Census maps continues to use the vertical slider but now incorporates this technique with two more comparison options. Each approach serves different purposes:

  1. The vertical slider bar provides a “before (2000) and after (2010)” visualization of change, either regionally or at the scale of a city neighborhood.
  2. The side-by-side comparison is ideal for lingering over a given area, especially at the local level, taking the time to absorb the differences in demographic patterns mapped with 2000 Census data on the left and 2010 on the right. We incorporated this approach specifically at the suggestion of the great interactive team at the Chicago Tribune, who have created some similar Census maps.
  3. The single-map 2010/2000 overlay is especially helpful for revealing the increase in diversity over a given area.

For example, you can zoom to Atlanta, GA on the single-map overlay and see the city’s predominantly Black population in 2000 surrounded by suburban Census blocks shaded dark blue, denoting a White population of 90% or more (see images below). As you transition the map from 2000 to 2010, the dark blue in the suburbs fades to a lighter shade (indicating a more mixed population demographically) coupled with more Census blocks shaded green, purple, and orange – each corresponding to communities that are now predominantly (even if only by a few percentage points) Hispanic, Asian, or Black respectively. This pattern is replicated in many of the urban regions featured at the website.

Atlanta & suburbs in 2000

Race/ethnicity change in Atlanta by 2010

Eventually we’ll be moving all this from pre-rendered tiles to vector tiles. CUR’s application architect Dave Burgoon contributed code he developed to TileStache to enable TileStache to produce AMF-based output for use in Flash-based interactive mapping applications. This will give us flexibility in mapping as many Census variables as needed, and also providing complete geographic coverage (hopefully down to the block level) nationwide. That’s the plan, anyway! Stay tuned.

Credits

Funding for much of the Center’s recent work on Census issues has been provided by the Building Resilient Regions Project of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Hagedorn Foundation, as well as support from the CUNY Graduate Center and the City University of New York.

Several people provided feedback and helpful editorial suggestions on earlier versions of the maps and narrative. Though the materials at this site were prepared by the Center for Urban Research, those invdividuals improved our work. We greatly appreciate their contributions.

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7 Responses

  1. [...] One of the map’s creators, Steven Romalewski, discusses the updates here. [...]

  2. [...] tool is simple to use, as described by the folks behind the site. The racial and ethnic composition of census blocks — which are about the size of city blocks [...]

  3. [...] tool is simple to use, as described by the folks behind the site. The racial and ethnic composition of census blocks — which are about the size of city blocks in [...]

  4. [...] tool is simple to use, as described by the folks behind the site. The racial and ethnic composition of census blocks — which are about the size of city blocks in [...]

  5. [...] est simple à utiliser, comme décrit par les gens derrière le site . La composition raciale et ethnique des îlots de recensement – qui sont de la taille des [...]

  6. [...] tool is simple to use, as described by the folks behind the site. The racial and ethnic composition of census blocks — which are about the size of city blocks [...]

  7. [...] borrowed from our “Census Comparinator” mapping site that Dave Burgoon artfully developed, in order to provide three ways to compare the current and [...]

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